You Are Here


Every so often my wife sends me to the mall with a list and instructions to visit specific stores and pick up specific items.

Being a man my mission when I go to any retail establishment, especially the mall, is the get in and get out as quickly as possible.  I’m a hunter, not a nomad, I bag my prey and go home.  I don’t have the time or the patience to wander around looking for something.  If it’s not exactly where she said it would be or I can’t find it in about 30 seconds they don’t have it.

Because I am always in a hurry, the first thing I do when I go to the mall or any large unfamiliar place is look for the map or seek out an associate who can point me in the right direction.  Most people when they look at a map will spend most of their time looking at their destination.  Of course, that’s important but knowing where you are going is only half the battle.  You also need to know where you are right now so you can plan a route.  It doesn’t matter if it’s the most direct route, or the most picturesque, or the one that takes you past the Dairy Queen so you can get that banana split you’ve been craving.  It just matters that it gets you from where you are, to where you want to go.

That’s why every mall map has a bright red dot marked “You Are Here.”

Personal financial planning is kind of like a mall map.  It’s all well and good to have clearly defined goals but without a clear understanding of your current situation, and how you got there, all the planning in the world is really just staring at your destination and wandering around without any clear idea of how to get there.  You might make it you might not but more often than not you’ll end up spending your whole life in the food court eating banana splits and wondering why your dreams never seem to come true.

There are key moments that occur in every financial planning relationship.  Usually sometime after, but sometimes before we determine some goals, we need to have the “you are here” discussion.  This is where we gather the data, look at what you’ve done up to this point and map out the route from where you are to where you want to go.  It doesn’t have to be the most directly route, there may be a few detours along the way.  Just like going to the mall, family members have a way of pulling you off course.  Goals and circumstances can change and sometimes that banana split, new car or dream vacation just calls out to you.  That’s okay.  But a financial plan, just like a mall map, only works when you have a clear understanding of where you are at any given time.

Now, here’s where the analogy breaks down a bit, so stay with me.

Once the plan has been established it’s the job of the financial planner to be your constant “you are here” dot.  Continually reminding you of where you are and providing route options to get you to your destination.  If you take a detour or break for a banana split, the planner is there to help you get back on track or reassess your goals.  The last time I checked the dot on the mall map doesn’t move around with you, a good planner does.

So, how does your planner keep you on track?  Let me know in the comments.

I’m off to Dairy Queen, I suddenly have a craving for a banana split.

Go Slow to Go Fast


The Enduring Value of a JAM Session

A lot of endurance athletes train slow in order to race fast.  I believe the concept works just as well in business and life as it does on the Iron Man or marathon course.

Here’s the 1000 foot view of the theory –

Training slow builds your endurance capacity, when you intersperse your training with hard but short speed sessions, you tax your muscles and encourage growth.  It’s essentially the same concept that weightlifters use when they push heavy weight and then back off for a few sessions.  As a result, over time your slow sessions get faster and on race day, when the adrenaline kicks in you can hold a slightly faster pace through the entire length of the race.

By contrast, people who have not prepared themselves for the faster, adrenaline induced race pace tend to fade at the end.  The goal on race day is to have enough left in the tank to run the last mile as confidently as you ran the first.

We can transfer this concept to business by incorporating what I call a JAM session into our routine.  A JAM session is a short burst of intense work where all distractions are blocked out and we focus on one thing for as long as it takes.  Turn off the phone, close the email and social media feeds, shut to door and go to work.

By doing these JAM sessions on a regular basis and when the situation warrants, we can increase our productivity and crank out some real quality work in intense bursts.  Like anything else, the more we do it, the better we get at it.  And it trains our brains to focus better when we aren’t jamming.  The end result is greater productivity overall.

Try it and let me know how it feels.

Here’s a video I produced on the same subject just the other day.

The People Behind The Numbers


Keeping Customers Front and Centre in All You Do

It’s happened to all of us.

You call your bank, internet service provider, electric company or any number of companies you do business with.  You have a simple request, maybe something a bit out of the ordinary but nothing that should require executive level approval.  Maybe you have a question about your bill or would like to make a minor change to your account settings.

You are greeted by a pre-recorded message, press one for English, two for French, three of Spanish, four for Pig Latin.  Please enter your account number, if you are calling about X,Y or Z press 1,2 or 3, etc.  This can go on for several minutes.  Eventually you get placed in a queue to speak with a representative.

The Muzak starts.

5-10-15-20 minutes pass.  Finally, when you start to think that if you hear one more saxophone rendition of Van Halen’s “Jump” you will literally vomit, someone picks up the phone.

There ensues a game of 20 questions, most of which you have already entered in the automated system; name, address, account number, dog’s name, what you ate for breakfast last Tuesday.  Then the operative question; “How can I help you today?”

You make your request.  There is a pause.  You think you hear some clicking noises as the representative types away and points their mouse at things.  Another pause.  “I’m sorry Mr. So and So (pronounced wrong, even though you’ve told them your name at least three times) it appears as though I’m not authorized to make that change today.”

Confused you make your request again, “But I just need you to…”  “Yes, I understand but for that I need to transfer you to another department, please hold.”

More Muzak.

That damn saxophone again!  You begin to feel queasy and hang up.

Sound familiar?

At various points throughout my adult life I have been on both sides of that call.  To be fair, call center workers are among the lowest wage, least appreciated and powerless employees at any organization.  This is a shame as they tend also to be the only people who interact directly with customers.  They are the literal face, or voice, of the company and yet they have no power.  If the company could replace all their call center people with automated systems they would, that’s what the “press 1 for X” labyrinth that precedes the call is all about.  It’s there to weed out the simplest requests and save their expensive people for the hard stuff, that they usually aren’t authorized to do anyway, so they take notes and kick your request up the chain to a higher paid representative for a decision.

Good customer service costs money.  First and foremost, it requires training and a level of trust and empowerment at the call center level that few companies are willing to give.  Instead they put in policies and procedures that take decision making power away from people and service the lowest common denominator.  Try to go outside the lines and you get shut down.

But when dealing with the public there is no common denominator.  Every customer is unique, and every situation requires good judgement and finesse. Training staff for these things isn’t easy but it is worth it.

People are not account numbers.  They are a complicated set of needs, emotions, histories, plans and goals.  Treat people as such and you engender good vibes, loyalty and respect that will pay dividends for years.  Shunt them into endless queues and sort them into ever smaller boxes of set parameters and watch them run for the nearest exit.

Next time you get caught in call center hell remember two things.  First, if you get a person at all, they probably can’t help you, just let them take their notes and have them push your request up the chain.  Second, remember that as much as you want to be treated like a real person, so do they, don’t be a dick about it.

Lay off the Dope


Dopamine that is…

Dopamine is a hormone produced in the brain.  It acts as a neurotransmitter which flows through your nervous system carrying messages between cells.  It also plays a big part in how we feel pleasure and helps us to focus and find things interesting.

Psychologically, because it is so closely linked to pleasure, dopamine has been linked to addiction and other destructive behaviors.  That pleasure you feel when you find something you really enjoy, isn’t always the thing itself, it’s the dopamine your brain releases in response.  And that good feeling dopamine is what leads to addictions of all types.  Couple that with the relaxation the comes from a hit of THC or the surge of adrenalin that comes from snorting cocaine and you have a potentially lethal combination.

In recent years, psychologist have also linked dopamine to other pleasurable behaviors.  One study showed a marked increase in dopamine every time young people received a new email, text message or social media notification.  No wonder our phones have become like appendages.

Because dopamine is so closely linked to anti-social smart phone addiction and destructive hedonistic behavior there has been a trend in recent years for some to experiment with a dopamine fast.  By cutting down on anything that brings pleasure, (food, sex, alcohol, social media) it is believed that you can reset your brain to better appreciate the little things.

This isn’t just trendy pseudo-science that millennials have adopted to help cut down on smart phone usage, its roots are a longstanding practice in addiction psychology.  Psychologist have been using dopamine fasting as treatment for drug and alcohol addiction for decades.  The mere anticipation of pleasure releases dopamine and creates a wanting in people, which then leads to compulsive behavior.  By removing the circumstances that trigger this wanting you can gradually bring down the desire and eventually reset the brain to find pleasure in other ways.  That’s why alcoholics stay out of bars, it’s the physical location itself that triggers the wanting and breaks the willpower to stay clean.

Why am I telling you this?

We live in a world where dopamine releasing behaviors are everywhere.  It’s not just drug addicts who are addicted to dopamine.  Smart phone and video game addiction are just as pervasive, if not more so.

In a report published in the American Economic Review, the journal of the American Economic Association, researchers found that deactivating social media accounts four weeks prior to the 2018 midterm elections resulted in subjects increase in socialization with friends and family, decrease in political polarization and an increase in overall subjective well-being.  But it wasn’t without difficulties, subjects reported classic symptoms of withdrawal in the first week, including depression and anxiety.  Even certain sounds, like the random chime of a bell or a vibration, triggered intense desire to go check their phones.

I began to notice some of these symptoms in myself about a year ago.  That’s when I imposed my own version of a dopamine fast.  I call it, taking a smart phone sabbath.  Once a week, for a month, I turned off my phone for 24 hours from sundown on Friday to sundown on Saturday to mirror the Jewish day of rest.  The results, though far from scientific, were remarkable.  The first few hours were the hardest but after I got over my initial urge to check my phone every few minutes, I found myself able to truly relax and unplug for the first time in years.  After that first month I stopped physically turning the phone off but now I am able to ignore it for several hours with no ill effects.

I am rarely on my phone after about 7:00 pm on weekdays or from Friday night to Monday morning.  When I start to feel the phone is controlling me, instead of the other way around, I turn it off altogether and go about my life.

These devices were originally designed to help us, not control us.  Lay off the dop(amine), and life your life.

 

Going the Distance


You decide how much you want to improve by choosing how many roadblocks to remove so economy improves past a certain threshold – one where you’re suddenly performing your best at any age.  – Philip Maffetone; The Endurance Handbook

While training for a triathlon I came across the above quote.  Philip Maffetone is a world-renowned medical Dr. and trainer of high-performing endurance athletes.  His patients include Olympic and World champions across several endurance sports including, marathon, ultra-marathon, Ironman and the Eco-Challenge adventure races. 

Much of what Dr. Maffetone teaches centers around the importance of nutrition, rest and long-slow endurance training that builds up muscular resilience and trains your body to use its natural fat content for fuel over long distances.  When he talks about removing roadblocks he is mostly talking about changes to behaviour and mindset that allow his patients to think differently about themselves and the training process in order to go to the next level. 

Life, especially the life of an entrepreneur, is an endurance sport. 

The more I get involved in the triathlon world the more I recognize the similarities between disciplines involved in endurance training and those involved in business and entrepreneurship.  Here are just a few that I have observed so far.

  1. Nutrition

Eating right reaps benefits across a broad range of activities.  Carbs and simple sugars are responsible for most weight gain and general fatigue.  The easiest way to lose those love handles and increase your energy is to cut out the carbs.  Foods heavy in wheat and potatoes like bread, and chips are the most obvious culprits but don’t forget pastas and cereals too.  Just stopping the late-night bag of potato chips for me was worth at least five pounds.  I’ve since virtually eliminated breads and most potato products from my diet and I’ve never felt better, both physically and mentally.

       2. Sleep

A close second to eating right is getting enough sleep.  Your body needs time to recover and repair itself after a long day and hard training.  Nothing provides that time better than a good night’s sleep.  Your brain needs it too.  Falling into a rem state allows your brain to sort through all the sensory data it received throughout the day and never had time to process.  Chronic fatigue leads to mental stresses and physical aliments with some studies even linking a lack of sleep to heart disease, cancer and Alzheimer’s disease.  Consistently getting eight hours of sleep during the week might not be practical in our hyper connected and high-octane world but a modest goal should be at least 6.5 – 7 hours from Sunday to Thursday with time to catch a few extra hours on Friday and Saturday nights.  I even like to go for a catnap of 20 minutes or so on both Saturday and Sunday afternoons, for me there is nothing better than the feeling I get from catching a few extra zees when I come home from church on a Sunday afternoon. 

        3. Take it slow

Endurance training isn’t about knocking out your personal best every day.  Incremental improvements come by consistently working toward a better time, but you are also training your body physically and mentally to handle the demands of the event.  That means slowing down enough to listen to your body and allow your brain to communicate with your muscles.  Once they know how to talk to each other, then you can push for a better time but that only comes after you’ve developed a solid understanding of what your body needs. 

The same is true in business.    You’re not going to sign the big deal every day.  Especially in a planning-based business like mine, you need to be comfortable and confident enough in your process to take it slow and let the client’s needs and understanding evolve over time.  Slow and incremental development leads to a plan that the client both understands and takes strong ownership in.  Without that ownership your client could move with the whims of the market.  The more your client takes ownership in the process, the less likely they are to leave you when times get tough.

        4. Go Far

Endurance racing is all about the distance covered.  Tell just about anyone that you ran a marathon and they won’t care about your time so much as they will be impressed that you finished at all.  People who have never stuck with something that is hard long enough to see it through will usually look at you with a combination envy and adoration. 

In business, going the distance means setting a lofty goal and then working tirelessly to achieve it, sometimes for years.  When talk about the fact I was involved in 3 Juno award winning projects (Canada’s Grammys) during my days in the music business people are impressed.  But nobody cares about the 12 years of late nights in the studio, smoke fills bars, hundreds of thousands of miles on the road, long days working the phones and endless rejection that preceded that first win.  Or the second win.  Or the third win.  They only care that I was part of something amazing. 

If it takes you 5, 10 or even 20 years to achieve your goal, so be it.  Hard things take time, but they’re worth it.

        5. Repeat

In just about any endeavor, once you know what to do to achieve success, all you need to do is break it down into a repeatable process and just keep doing the same things over again.  The first Juno took 12 years, we won the second one four years later, and the third just two years after that.  It didn’t get any easier, we had just learned the process of recording, manufacturing, promotion and sales that would lead to success and were able to repeat the steps without wasting time on things that didn’t work. The same is true of everything worth doing, learn the process, cut out the redundancies, and repeat what works.

I am sure there are more parallels that I could draw between endurance training and business.  Life is journey, not a destination.  The journey is long.  Eat right, get enough rest, take your time, go the distance and repeat the process and you will find success.  That’s a promise.

 

A Tale of Two Financial Advisors


Once upon a time there were a lot of people who bought Life Insurance and opened Small Investment Accounts from an independent financial advisor.  Unfortunately, this advisor never stayed in touch once the policy was delivered and the premium cheques were cashed.

Every day, these people wondered what had happened to the friendly advisor who seemed to genuinely care about their needs one minute and had disappeared from their lives the next.  As their life circumstances changed and their needs evolved, they wondered if they had done the right thing, if they were adequately protected, and if they would ever be able to retire.

One day they decided to take matters into their own hands, but they didn’t know where to turn, who to trust, or what questions to ask.

Because of that, they felt confused, let down, worried and distrustful of independent experts.

Because of that, they gravitated toward simple and easy solutions offered by banks and store-front brokers that gave limited advice and parked their money in simple, low risk and low return investments.

Until finally their greatest fears came true, they realized they hadn’t saved enough for retirement or someone died prematurely without adequate life insurance and it was too late to change anything.

As a result, these people had to make radical decisions just to survive.  They delayed retirement until they could no longer physically do their jobs, remortgaged or sold their homes and used the money to live on.  They lived out their golden years in a general state of stress and eventually died leaving behind little to no legacy for their loved ones.

But…

On the other side of town their lived another financial advisor who valued customer service above everything else.

Every day, he called a subset of his clients to ask if anything in their lives had changed since the last time they’d talked.  Everyone got a call at least twice a year, once on their birthday and once again throughout the year.  As their life circumstanced changed and their needs evolved, these clients knew that their advisor would make sure that they were adequately protected and were putting enough money away to eventually retire.

One day these clients decided to see if they were getting close to being able to retire and they knew exactly who to call because they trusted their advisor to always take their best interests to heart while he answered their questions and made recommendations.

Because of that, they took his advice and felt confident, calm and cared for.

Because of that, they invested their money wisely, made strong returns over a long time and carried just a little bit more Life Insurance in-case something bad and unexpected happened.

Until finally their dreams came true, they were able to retire with confidence and not worry about what might happen if someone died too soon.

As a result, these clients retired on their own terms and had the energy and time to live out their golden years in stress free comfort.  They too eventually died but they left behind a significant monetary legacy for their loved ones and many sweet memories of a life well lived.

Which advisor’s client would you like to be?  Reach out in the comments below for a no obligation consultation…

Top 4 Reasons Why CashFlow Management is The New Gold Standard in Financial Planning


When was the last time your Financial Planner or Banker asked you anything about your cash flow plan or personal budget?

Nearly 80% of Canadians surveyed have said that managing day to day cash flow is their top financial concern yet less than 5% of financial service professionals are equipped to help in any way.   Independent Financial Planners make most of their money advising semi-wealthy and wealthy individuals on long term investment strategies and tax effective income planning for retirement.  And Banks?  They are primarily in the business of lending money, not helping you save it.

The sad fact is that middle class individuals and average Joes just don’t have a large enough asset base to get the attention of most commission based Financial Planners, while the banks make more profit lending money than they do advising you on how to save.

For most people the fastest way to build wealth is to get control of your debt.  Independent Financial Planners tend not be interested in your debt because they have access to very few products that can help you.  Banks tend to be too quick to lend even more money in order to keep you beholden to them longer.  Both have a built-in conflict of interest which keeps them looking at just one side of your balance sheet and prevents average people from making any significant progress.  A true Financial Plan needs to take into consideration both sides of the balance sheet to really help.

Here are the top 4 Reasons Why CashFlow Management is the new gold standard in Financial Planning.

1 – Get More Life From Your Money – When banks lend you money they calculate a number called your Total Debt Service Ratio, (TDSR).  If your income verses the amount of money you spend just to service your debt is less than 35% most banks won’t hesitate to lend you more.  What they are essentially saying is that you don’t need up to 35% of your income to live on.  What if you had that extra 35% in your pocket?  How much more “life” could you afford?

2 – Find Money to Fund Your Dreams – How many times have you stifled your dreams because you thought you didn’t have the cash?  Getting control of your cashflow is step one in finding that needed money and starting to save for your future dreams.  Maybe you want to buy that dream home, start a business or take a trip around the world.  What’s stopping you is likely nothing more than a poorly managed cashflow plan.

3 – Stop “Money Leaks” on Stuff That Doesn’t Matter – When you take a close look at your cashflow you will almost always find places to trim without even noticing a change in your lifestyle.  How many of those premium cable channels do you really watch?  Is your car insured for more than it’s worth?  And be honest, when was the last time you went to the gym?  Plugging these money leaks could account for as much as a 10-15% gain on your bottom line.

4 – Finally Telling Your Money What To Do, Not Just Wondering What it’s Done – Once you’ve stopped the money leaks, reorganized your debt and started to save for the future, life can get really fun!  Now you have money left over and you get to decide what to do with it.

 

I am a Financial Security Advisor and CashFlow Specialist.  I will work with you to help you reorganize your debt and increase your savings.  I work both sides of the balance sheet and raise the bottom line.  Most of my clients are on track to be debt free seven years sooner while saving tens of thousands of dollars in inefficient interest payments and leaked money.

Get in touch today for a free CashFlow Analysis and Personal Financial Plan.

Thanks in Advance


I’ll be honest.  I hate that phrase.

Most of the time when someone says to me, “Thanks in Advance” it feels as though they are making assumptions about my completion of a task or compliance with a request without waiting for me to agree in the first place.

More than once I’ve been tempted to respond with:

“Bite Me! – Thanks in Advance.”

I am happy to say that my cooler head usually prevails, and I am much more charitable with my responses.  I recognize that offering gratitude when making a request is a good idea, please just don’t use the phrase “Thanks in Advance”.

When you go to restaurant, or work with any kind of customer service agent do you give a tip?  Of course you do!  But did you know that originally the tip was given at the start of the interaction, not the end?

The origins of the word “tip” is an acronym that stands for “To Insure Performance” and it was often broken into two parts.  “Here’s $5, there’s another $10 in it for you when we’re finished if you do a good job.”

That kind of proactive gratitude can change the interaction between parties profoundly.  But it is far more than just dropping a few dollars and saying thanks in advance.  Gratitude is not something that can be done cheaply or sporadically, it needs to become part of our constant attitude.

Cultivating an attitude of gratitude (I hate that phase too, not because it’s wrong it just sounds cheesy), starts with saying thank you but when it becomes a part of who we are it leads to level of graciousness, that people will remember forever.  And people want to do things for other people when they feel like they are appreciated.

So make gratitude a part of your daily life.  Be thankful for everything.

Rather than saying “thanks in advance”.  Drop little thank you bombs into the conversation every chance you get.  Start a meeting with “hey, thanks for meeting with me.”  When you make a request for something say; “thanks for considering this, or thanks for taking the time to review my proposal.”  As the relationship moves forward don’t forget to say thank you at every completed stage.

Don’t be afraid to say thank you in public either.  Giving a seminar?  Thank the organizer for inviting you right from the stage.   Sign a big contract?  Thank your client on twitter or facebook, just be careful not to reveal anything that might be considered confidential.

I thanked a client on twitter once and they retweeted it to all of their followers.   It was a great way to increase my own exposure and generate even more leads.  So I thanked them for that too!

People love to be thanked and being gracious always pays dividends.

Thanks to Darren Hardy (@darrenhardy) for giving me the idea of this post.

Thank you for reading it.

Who do you want to thank today?  Tell me in the comments below or forward this post directly to them, I will be super grateful if you do, and I’ll make sure you know it…

 

The Day I Realize, I’m Dumb!


We left off last time talking about the 5 Whys process for turning failure into success.  As we get close to the end of the year I’ve started using the 5 Whys to analyze my past successes and failures and make plans for 2018.

I’ve come to an uncomfortable conclusion.

When I look at some of my biggest failures from this past year.  The lost deals, the solid prospects that the just didn’t convert, the opportunities that withered on the vine and the clients that just outright left, the answer to the 5th why is a variation of the same thing.

“I was dumb!”

That sounds trite, but it’s accurate.

More to the point, I was Emotionally Unintelligent.

In every instance of failure that I analyzed I came to the same conclusion.  I one way or another I was out of sync with my client or prospect and failed to recognize what truly mattered to them.  I made the sales process all about product and forgot about the client’s underlying emotional needs.  And what’s worse, as the prospect pulled away I made their failure to move forward all about me and my failure to communicate the benefits of the product.  As deals started to spin away from me I doubled down on a strategy that wasn’t working and further alienated the prospect.

Emotional Intelligence has been defined by Dr. Travis Bradberry, author of the best selling “Emotional Intelligence 2.0” as,

your ability to recognize and understand emotions in yourself and others, and your ability to use this awareness to manage your behavior and relationships.

The chart to the right is a typical four quadrant diagram that is popular with psychologists in analyzing behavior.  In this diagram we see the four core skills of Self-Awareness, Self-Management, Social Awareness and Relationship Management aligned with perception; what I see and reaction; what I do.  These skills are further aligned with personal and social competency.

In my failures I tend to be severely lacking in the perception side of the diagram, I don’t see how people are reacting to what I am doing and therefore am unable to adjust my behavior in a way that makes people comfortable moving forward in relationship with me.  If I were to place myself as a dot on the diagram I would be in the top right corner, very strong in Self-Management, I work hard and am disciplined.  I’m very task oriented, my mantra could be that the best kind of To-Do List is a Done List.  But I am extremely lacking in Social Awareness.   In my desire to get things done I tend to push people aside.

My greatest failure of 2017 was with a fast-growing company that I had the opportunity to work with on setting up a Group Benefits program.  I am met with the prospect and immediately hit it off with one of the co-owners.  We were having a great time, talking about business, telling jokes and swapping stories about our past business successes and failures.

Everything was going great.

Then my prospect took me into his partner’s office to say hello.  His partner was in another meeting, but we interrupted because we thought what we had was more important.  To be fair – I didn’t interrupt the meeting, my prospect did and that’s not what I believe caused the problem.

I was introduced around the room as “The Group Benefits Guy”, and while there were other people in the room I immediately forgot their names and laser focused my attention on the business partner.  Looking back at it now I realize that in that moment I went from the fun-loving Group Benefits Guy who was going to help this company move it’s HR process to the next level to that jerky salesman who only cares about people who are in a position of power.  It took a few more weeks but I truly believe that the opportunity was lost in that moment.

A few weeks later the prospect told me that they were pretty much ready to go with the Group Benefits plan, all we had to do was confirm with the partner.  I never heard from the company again.  My follow up messages went unanswered and within a few more months I found out that they had signed up with a competitor.

In doing my 5 Why’s analysis of that failure I concluded that at the critical moment, when I needed to show that I was in tune with the culture of the organization and took their people’s best interests seriously, I failed.  I was emotionally dumb.  To this day I still don’t remember the names of the other people in the room.  For a time, I even forgot the partner’s name and just referred to him in an email as “your partner”.

Why am telling you all this?

Studies have shown that people of average intelligence out-perform those with higher intelligence nearly 70% of the time.  The difference isn’t in classic measures of intelligence.  It’s in how we interact with each other.  Top performers have a higher emotional intelligence and can align their Personal Competencies with their Social Competencies and their perception with their actions.  The closer to the center of that four quadrant diagram you can hang out, the more successful you will be.

I’m not big on New Year’s Resolutions.  I prefer to make course corrections as I become aware of a need and this one is huge.  If I were to make a New Year’s Resolution for 2018 it would be this – To become more Emotionally Intelligent, get better at truly seeing people and working to aligning my actions with their needs.

Putting Insomnia To Bed


Not getting enough sleep? Here are eight strategies that can help.

As the saying goes; “You snooze, you lose.” But when you don’t get enough sleep, nobody wins. When we’re tired, we tend not to exercise or eat right either. We also get more irritable, stressed out and are more likely to get sick. And we don’t work as well when we’re tired. By some accounts, sleep deprivation costs Canadian businesses more than $15 billion a year in lost productivity.

So how do you get the rest you need? Try these strategies to help you get a better night’s sleep.

1 – Create a bed-time ritual

Go to bed at the same time every night and get up at the same time every morning, even on the weekend. Establishing a pattern of calming bedtime activities like taking a bath, reading, meditation or writing in your journal can help to train you mind and body that it’s time to settle down.

2- Put away your smartphone

Blue light from your phone (or tablet) suppresses the production of melatonin. That is why people who spend a lot of time looking at a screen before bed have more trouble nodding off. If you like to read e-books, try a reader that isn’t back-lit or use a screen cover that minimizes blue light.

3 – Take the pressure off

Poor sleep is our number-one response to stress. It’s also a bit of a double-edged sword as not getting enough shut-eye actually increases stress. So how do you break the cycle? Find ways to recharge and calm down throughout the day. Go for a walk, practice mindfulness exercises, or yoga. Small changes to your daily routine can make a big difference.

4 – Cool it

A cool room can help you too relax as well. Our body temperature naturally drops as we fall asleep, an environment that’s too warm may actually inhibit drifting off. Ideal bedroom temperatures range from 19 to 22 C.

5 – Lose the light

Too much ambient light can suppress melatonin production while darkness triggers it. The darker your bedroom the better so if you live in a brightly light city or near a large industrial installation installing blackout curtains and removing electronics with light-up displays can help.

6 – Move more

People who exercise regularly tend to sleep better. Working out three or four times a week can make a real difference. Don’t hit the gym too close to bedtime though, or the adrenalin from your workout could end up keeping you awake. Morning workouts are best but try to give yourself at least 2 hours for your body to return to normal before trying to go to sleep.

7 – Eat to sleep

Certain foods can help you nod off at night too. Vitamin B6 is important for making melatonin. B6-rich foods like fish, bananas, chickpeas, nuts and lentils can help. Drinking tart cherry juice, right before bed has been proven to alleviate insomnia in some cases.

 

8 – Avoid alcohol

We all know that cutting back on caffeine can reduce wakefulness. But most forms of alcohol inhibit sleep too.   This one is a bit counter intuitive until you think about it.  A glass of wine may help you drift off, but as the relaxing effects of the alcohol wear off the fermented sugars take over and you’re suddenly wide awake again.

Still can’t sleep?

Try not to stress about it. Insomnia can happen to almost everyone. If you’re tired all the time, talk to your doctor, maybe you have sleep apnea or another underlying cause.

Sweet dreams….

Lauren C. Sheil is a serial entrepreneur who has been in business for over 25 years. His latest book “Meekoethics: What Happens When Life Gets Messy and the Rules Aren’t Enough” is available on Amazon.com.

He can be reached at themeekonomicsproject@gmail.com or by calling 613-295-4141.

 

 

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