Fire Insurance for Your Life


Preparing for the Next Crisis

I hope this finds you healthy and safe in the midst of this unprecedented time.

I once had a long argument with a close friend about how best to support a mutual friend through a crisis.  I don’t remember the specifics, but I do remember that I was advocating for providing immediate support while he was lecturing them on how they could have avoided the situation in the first place.

I finally lost my cool and declared –

“The fireman doesn’t stand on your lawn lecturing about safety while your house burns down, grab an [expletive] hose!”

Right now, many of you are dealing with a financial house on fire.  The Employment Insurance department of the Canadian government usually processes about 27,000 cases a week, last week they received almost 1 million new applications.  If you haven’t lost your job, it’s a pretty safe bet to assume that your world has been significantly altered in some way.  If you are a business owner who has been forced to close your situation is even more dire and complicated.

So far, the government has done a fairly decent job of providing us all with a firehose.  The emergency aid package is not without complications and many people are still experiencing significant stress but it’s better than nothing and as they work out the bugs in the system, I’m sure it will get better.

Like rebuilding after a fire, in the coming weeks we will all have to deal with the fall out from this crisis and there a few things that I can help you start to do now to help you be better prepared for the next time.  Think about it like fire insurance for your life.

1 – Develop an Emergency Fund

Experts tell us that we should all have between 3 and 6 months of expenses saved for emergencies.  Sudden job loss, uninsured damage to property, uninsured health complications, they all have the potential to burn your financial house down.  I encourage everyone, regardless of your financial situation to at least set aside $1000 in a Tax-Free Savings Account.   As you are able, most people are okay to build that up to 3 months of fixed expenses, 6 months is only necessary if you are self-employed or working on contract.

Canada Life offers a broad range of investment options that are suitable to be held as an emergency fund TFSA.   Once this crisis is over and as soon as you are able, let’s get that done.

2 – Eliminate High Interest Debt

If you are carrying a balance on credit cards or any other forms of high interest debt, you should plan to pay that off as soon as possible.  After you’ve set aside the minimum $1000 in the emergency fund but before you worry about the full 3 months of expenses, get your debt dealt with.

As a result of the financial crunch this crisis is causing, we have already seen a significant decrease in mortgage rates across Canada.  If you own your home now is the perfect time to refinance and consolidate it with as much of your other debt as possible.  Canada Life offers a very competitive mortgage program with posted rates among the lowest in the country, along with a home equity line of credit, that could save you thousands and set you on a track to debt freedom years sooner.

Even without a lot of high interest debt, this may be a good option for you.  If you own your home and would like to see how this kind of refinancing can provide an extra layer of security for the next crisis, I’d be happy to show you how.

3 – Review your Living Benefits

The term Living Benefits is a fancy way of saying disability insurance.  In contrast to life insurance, living benefits are all the kinds of insurance tied to your health and wellbeing that pay out while you are still alive.

One thing this crisis has taught us is that we cannot take our health and wellbeing for granted.  While most employed individuals have some insurance through a company health plan should they become sick and unable to work, most people don’t know what it covers or for how long.  Many people are surprised to learn that their policy has a long wait period or provides only a fraction of what is required to maintain their standard of living.   Canada Life offers a number of living benefits programs that could provide that added level of support at a critical time and be the difference between a smooth and relaxed recovery or a drawn out and stressful one.

 

As I said at the outset, if your financial house is on fire, now is not be the time to drop everything and buy into any of these programs.  But if you are able, we are open for business and ready to help.  This crisis will pass, and I want to be there for you when it does.  Let’s stay in touch and when you are ready let’s make sure you are prepared for the next crisis before it hits.

Stay healthy and safe everyone.  We’re all in this together.

Lauren

The Three Question Fact Find for Business Owners (Part Two)


Part 2 of 3

Last week was a crazy one for me.  Seven client appointments in 3 days, plus a morning away from the office and a holiday Monday had me playing catch up all week.  As a result, I wasn’t able to post to the Vlog until Saturday and didn’t get a new post written here at all.  Hopefully this week I can get back into a regular rhythm of things.  Not that I’m complaining, if I don’t post for a few days it usually means I’m working directly with clients, and that’s what it’s all about right?

For the past couple of weeks, I’ve been working through a series focused on my standard The Three Question Fact Find.  Every new client relationship starts with the same three questions.  If you’re just finding this you should probably take a minute to catch up by walking through those questions and the accompanying videos here:

Question One – Do you have any Debt?  Blog and video.

Question Two – Do you have a plan to sustainably protect and grow your assets?  Blog and video

Question Three – Where do you want your money to go after you die?  Blog and video

Question One for Business Owners – What would happen to you, your business and the people you care about if you didn’t show up to work tomorrow?  Blog and video

Now we turn the focus off the individual business owner and shine the spotlight on your second greatest asset, the people who work for you.

Question Two – Do you have a plan to protect and reward your most loyal employees? 

 

As a small business owner your greatest asset is your own ability to work and earn an income.  We dealt with that last time.  Your second greatest asset is that ability to work and be productive coming from your team.

According to Stats Canada, sick days cost the Canadian economy $16.6B per year in 2013.  Companies that offer a comprehensive health plan including prescription drugs, dental, and disability insurance can expect the cost of illness to be significantly offset.

However, the greatest advantage of offering a health plan isn’t from the costs directly associated with illnesses.  It is in the goodwill and loyalty felt by employees.  According to Glassdoor.com 3 out of 5 employees say that the quality of a benefits package figured significantly in their decision to accept a job offer and their ongoing loyalty to the company.  And 92% of employees reported that, all other thing being equal, they would switch employers for a better benefits package.

Clearly benefits are important to employees.  But the financial incentive to employers doesn’t end there.  The cost of the average benefits package is 3-6% of payroll but since premiums paid are fully tax deductible, the actual out of pocket expense for a company is approximately 15% less than giving employees a comparable raise.

And that’s just a health plan.  Couple that with a retirement planning package like a Group RRSP or pension program and the loyal factor increases again.  Coming from an employer nothing says, “I appreciate you and the work you do,” more than comprehensive group health, disability and retirement plan.

So, if I could show you a way to significantly increase employee loyalty and engagement without incurring an unmanageable expense, would that be a conversation worth having?

For more information or help with your financial plan contact:  lauren.sheil@f55f.com or simply leave a comment below.

The Three Question Fact Find for Business Owners (Part One)


Part 1 of 3

For the past couple of weeks, I’ve been working on a series focusing on what I call The Three Question Fact Find.  For me every new client relationship starts with the same three questions.  If you’re just joining the conversation you might want to catch up by walking through those questions and the accompanying videos here:

Question One – Do you have any Debt?  Blog and video.

Question Two – Do you have a plan to sustainably protect and grow your assets?  Blog and video

Question Three – Where do you want your money to go after you die?  Blog and video

Since I tend to work with a lot of business owners and their employees, I have found that these individuals come to the table with a unique set of circumstances. As a result, I have developed a second Three Question Fact Find for Business Owners.  Depending on the nature of my relationship with the business I may start with the original three questions and then move on to these additional questions or I may start here and circle back to the first set of questions later.  Regardless of how I get there, the ultimate result is the same, for business owners the Three Question Fact Find is six.

Question One – What happens to you, your business and the people you care most about if you or a key employee don’t make it to work tomorrow?

We aren’t talking about something minor keeping you away from work for a few days, or even a couple of weeks, like the flu or a broken finger.  We’re talking about a major, life altering event that keeps you home, or heaven forbid in hospital and unable to see to day to day operations, for several weeks or even months.  Who runs the business then?  How do you get paid?

Statistics Canada reports that people under the age of 65 are three times more likely to be off work for 90 days or more at some point in their career than they are to die.  What’s more, business owners tend to push the envelope and come back to work before they are physically ready often ending up re-injuring themselves or re-aggravating whatever ailment it was that sidelined them in the first place.

Most business owners understand the value of life insurance to protect their families and provide a way for business partners to buy out their shares.  Very few however have considered the consequences of living through a long-term illness only to watch their only source of income fizzle away.  Long Term Disability Insurance structured as either income replacement or overhead expense coverage can go a long way to keeping your business viable while you are concentrating on recovery.  Coupled with Critical Illness Insurance to offset one-time expenses associated with specified illnesses, like a heart-attack or cancer, and you can have most of your bases covered in terms of long-term health related concerns.

Each of these options can also be extended to key employees should there be people within the organization whose services can’t be easily duplicated.  What if your top salesperson for instance had a car accident on the way home tonight, heaven forbid, and needed six months of rehab to learn how to walk again?

In most cases once we’ve dealt with the personal needs of the business owner and their family the next most important question for any owner must turn the focus to the long-term viability of their business.  So, the question remains, what would happen if you or a key employee didn’t show up to work tomorrow?

For more information or help with your financial plan contact:  lauren.sheil@f55f.com or simply leave a comment below.

The Three Question Fact Find (Part Two)


Part 2 of 3 (For Families)

Continuing where we left off the other day.  The second question for the family market starts to focus in on your hopes and dreams for the future while still living your best life now.  Before we go any further though you might want to review where we came from and read the first post in this series.  Question One – Do you have any debt and watch the video on the same topic here.  Da L-Dawg Show – Episode 5 – Do you have any debt?

Now, let’s move on.

Question Two – Do you have a plan to sustainably protect and grow your assets?

I believe it was Charles Schwab who said that the only thing that matters to investors is yield.  While yield (or percentage growth) is important the key concept in my question for families isn’t how fast we grow your assets, it’s how we sustain that growth over the long haul through market cycles and the overall eb and flow of life.  Growing assets is easy, protecting them from market volatility and personal setbacks takes discipline, planning and a little grace.

Just about anyone can help you save for retirement.  Banks, Credit Unions and Investment Advisors can all provide you with investment vehicles designed to help you grow your assets but a financial plan is more that just an investment plan and making a mad rush to beat the RRSP income tax deadline every February isn’t sustainable.  A good financial plan answers two additional questions; “How much is enough?” and “What happens if I die too soon, live too long or my plans get interrupted?”

Answering the how much question is the easy part.  By looking at your current lifestyle, discussing your goals, and taking into consideration your life expectancy we can make a reasonable assessment of how much money you’re going to need, when, and for how long.  At that point it’s just a matter of reverse engineering where you are now, versus where you need to get to and determining how much money to set aside, for how long and at what yield.

Presto!  You now have an investment plan.  But that is still not a complete financial plan.

The tricky part comes in answering the second question.  If you die too soon your family could be put in a difficult situation, forced to make drastic changes just to survive.  The loss of your income due to death, disability or other economic pressures could present challenges keeping debts paid, funding children’s education or just keeping the lights turned on.  Not to mention the very real possibility of our medical system figuring out ways to keep you alive longer than your money can reasonably last.  This is were old school investment planning, the how much and now long discussion, meets insurance planning and becomes a full-fledged financial plan.  The effective use of life, disability and critical illness insurance, along with certain principle protected investment funds are an often-overlooked part of the planning process no matter your stage of life.

So, do you have a plan to sustainably protect and grow your assets?

Stay tuned for question three – Where do you want your money to go after you die?

For more information or help with your financial plan contact:  lauren.sheil@f55f.com or simply leave a comment below.

The Big 3 Life Changing Events that can Significantly Affect Your Finances


In my practice as Financial Security Advisor I hear variations of these themes almost every day, my job of course is the help people live life to the fullest, get out of debt, build wealth and leave a legacy but that’s a lot harder than it sounds, especially when one of these large uncontrollable and unpredictable events occurs. But there are a few things we can do to prepare, and throw you a life line when you need it.

1 – Serious Illness

According to a Statistics Canada report from 2011, about 8% of full-time employees are away from their jobs for part or all of any given week due to illness, disability, or personal and family responsibilities. When you add it all up people miss an average of just over nine days at work every year. Illnesses very greatly in intensity and cost, they can range from a head-ache with the sniffles to Ebola. They can be acute (and over relatively quickly) or chronic (and last a long time). Whether an illness affects you or a close family member, it may lead to unpaid absences from work as well as a wide range of additional expenses that aren’t covered by provincial health plans or employer benefits.

Check with your employer or your benefits manual to find out exactly what is, and isn’t covered, and consider purchasing additional coverage in the form of Long Term Disability or Critical Illness Insurance to avoid some of the financial losses that could occur should something like this happen to you.

2 – Job Loss

Again, according to Statistics Canada, in 2015, the economy created 151,000 full-time jobs.

Yay?

On the surface this looks like good news, but it doesn’t tell the whole story. The unemployment rate still rose by 0.4% to 7.1% with 110,000 more people looking for work at the end of the year. Some of the people were of course new to the work force, newly graduated from colleges and universities, or new immigrants but others were established and experienced workers who had lost their jobs. Job loss can sweep through a specific industry, like manufacturing in Ontario or the oil patch in Alberta. Or it can happen individually. Some lucky workers are offered severance packages but too often they receive nothing and families face an immediate drop in income.

Job loss is the very definition of a financial emergency and the number one reason you should have an emergency fund of at least 3 months of expenses. Knowing your bills will be paid while you look for work and wait for other forms of support like government employment insurance to kick in can relieve a lot of stress associated with losing your job.

3 – Divorce

About 70,000 divorces are finalized every year in Canada, not to mention the breakdown of common-law relationships that never make it into the official numbers. Separation and divorce carry with them far more considerations than the merely financial concerns that come up and I don’t mean to over simplify and minimize what can be a significantly painful and personal experience. It may be the result of years of discord, or sudden and unexpected but the fact is that managing two households is significantly more expensive than one and when one party makes considerably less income than the other the impact is often felt disproportionately.

Not to mention the potential for a large legal bill at the end of it all. Engaging the help of a financial security advisor to help separate financial assets, like joint retirement accounts, life insurance policies and RESPs is a must for any separating couple.

This is by no means an exhaustive list but keeping these three things in mind when designing your financial plan could go a long way to avoiding a lot of extra head-ache, heart-ache and stress down the road.

Lauren C. Sheil is a serial entrepreneur who has been in business for over 25 years. He has operated a small farm, a recording studio and a music manufacturing plant, and has written 3 books on Economics, Ethics and Spirituality.  He has presented his ideas to business owners and leaders from all over the world. His latest book “Meekoethics: What Happens When Life Gets Messy and the Rules Aren’t Enough” is available on Amazon.com.

Mr. Sheil is currently a Financial Security Advisor and Business Planning Specialist with one of Canada’s premier financial planning organizations.  He brings to his work a passion for people and a desire to teach everyone to live life to the fullest while Eliminating Debt, Building Wealth and Leaving a Legacy.  

He can be reached at themeekonomicsproject@gmail.com or by calling 613-295-4141.

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7 Tips to Recover from a Financial Setback


why-meBad things happen to good people. Overcoming financial challenges – in whatever form – takes dedication, patience and planning.

In life, you will have trouble, that’s a given. This can include losing your job, going through a divorce, or experiencing a serious illness. Then there are all those unexpected expenses life throws at you. A leaky roof, flooded basement, major car repair – any one of these could cost thousand, with no time to waste and room to negotiate.

And to add insult to injury, often times, more than one of these situations occur at once. It’s fairly obvious to think that these challenges often affect your finances – so how do you recover?

Here are seven tips for getting back in track after a financial setback, as recently published in “Solutions for Financial Planning”, a periodical publication from Manulife Financial.

  1. Get Professional Advice – A professional perspective can be invaluable, no matter the size of your problem. An financial advisor can help you assess the impact on both your short-term and long-term plans, adjust your goals, and develop a plan that helps lead to recovery. Getting advice first, will help you avoid making bad decisions like, racking up a large credit card balance that could only serve to prolong your troubles. Your advisor should help you gain perspective, relax a bit and offer constructive solutions to your problem.
  2. Tighten You Budget – Your budget probably has some slack. Regardless of the cause of your troubles, it’s time to eliminate that slack and get your budget back in balance. Take a hard look at your non-essential costs. I encourage all of my clients to play a little game call “Every Dollar Has A Name” in order to find the margin in their budget. Are there free or lower-cost alternatives to the things you do on a regular basis? Borrowing books, magazines and videos from the library, activities in a local park or at a community centre, or the ever popular staycation versus expensive vacation can all help save thousands. You could even take a look at negotiating a better deal on certain products and services without cutting back.
  3. changesExplore Big-Ticket Cost Savings – If things look as if they could have a lasting impact, and a high cost, it may be time to make some significant changes to your lifestyle. Changes that go beyond simple trimming and include some of the biggest line items in your budget. Consider moving to a smaller home a more affordable area and can you make do with one car? Major changes are difficult, but they may be the key to helping protect your future.
  4. Earn Extra Income – Spending less can only go so far, can you bring in more money? Can you sell something of value like art, an antique or a collectible? Maybe you can work more hours or even take a second job. Or course, working more takes time away from other commitments and might increase certain expenses like child care. And don’t forget the tax implications of earning more income. Ask your advisor to help you run all the numbers to ensure your extra income will more than pay for those extra costs.
  5. Talk To Your Mortgage Provider – If you have a mortgage, you may be able negotiate more manageable terms. You could switch from accelerated to more standard payments or if you’ve made lump-sum prepayments in the past, you may qualify for a short-term holiday from payments. It might also be possible to lengthening your mortgage’s amortization and add any payments you’ve missed to your balance. Lastly, if you are close to the renewal date on your mortgage, a full scale consolidation and change of provider may be in order.
  6. Talk To Other Creditors Too – Don’t letting bills slide, call your creditors, explain your situation and ask to lower your interest rate or reduce your payments. Most companies recognize the value of keeping you as a customer long term and are willing to negotiate rather than take a hard line and risk losing your as a customer forever. This can give you the breathing room you need to get through the worst of a setback and help protect your credit rating.
  7. Borrow Sensibly – If you simply can’t find any more savings or increase your piggywaterincome and you’ve run through your savings, check into the lowest-cost sources of borrowing. This can usually take the form of a secured line of credit or the aforementioned consolidation loan. Your advisor can help you identify the best solution for you.

 

Recovery from a financial shock is a journey. It will likely take several months or even years to get back to where you once were. But with a little determination, patience, planning and hard work, it can be done!

As things start to improve, make sure you stick to a streamlined budget and put extra money towards your long term debts. Start building a substantial emergency fund (three to six months of expenses) so you have resources on hand the next time you hit a financial speed bump.

Once you are in a stronger position, with more a bit more margin, look at other ways to help protect yourself from future shocks, such as various forms of personal insurance including, health, dental, critical illness and disability coverage. Start to set some money aside for the future too in one of the many government sponsored tax advantaged savings vehicles like a Tax-Free Savings Account (TFSA), Registered Retirement Savings Plan (RRSP) or even a Registered Education Savings Plan (RESP).

After enough time has passed and you have recovered emotionally from the stress, take some time to look back and think about what you might have done differently. Hindsight is 20/20 so use it to your advantage. Learn from the experience, without assigning blame and make sure you’re in a stronger financial position in case another difficult situation occurs.

balancingLastly, and I can’t stress this enough, go back to the very first tip and engage the help of professional financial advisor. Strong financial advice means a strong financial future. Households with an advisor are more likely to:

  • Have enough money to live the life they want (61 per cent compared to 31 per cent with no financial plan)
  • Be able to take an annual vacation (74 per cent compared to 44 per cent with no financial plan)
  • Have enough money for splurges (65 per cent compared to 31 per cent with no financial plan)

It doesn’t “just happen.” But it does happen if you have the right plan and support.

Lauren C. Sheil is a serial entrepreneur who has been in business for over 25 years. He has operated a small farm, a recording studio and a music manufacturing plant, and has written 3 books on Economics, Ethics and Spirituality.  He has presented his ideas to business owners and leaders from all over the world. His latest book “Meekoethics: What Happens When Life Gets Messy and the Rules Aren’t Enough” is available on Amazon.com.

Mr. Sheil is currently a Financial Security Advisor and Business Planning Specialist with one of Canada’s premier financial planning organizations.  He brings to his work a passion for people and a desire to teach everyone to live life to the fullest while Eliminating Debt, Building Wealth and Leaving a Legacy.  

He can be reached at themeekonomicsproject@gmail.com or by calling 613-295-4141.

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Don’t Tax My Health Benefits!


taxRecent media reports suggest the Government of Canada is considering a new federal tax on the employer-paid portion of your health and dental plan coverage.

In 1993, a similar provincial income tax on the employer-paid portion of benefit plans was introduced in Quebec. It resulted in almost 20 per cent of Quebec employers (including up to 50 per cent of small business employers) terminating their group benefit plans. Under the proposed legislation, employee coverage would be considered a taxable benefit (additional income).  So that $500 visit to the dentist, would now have to be declared, not as an expense but as income on your T4.

So What?

Taxing the employer-paid portion of benefit plans may have the following implications:

  • As an employee, you would have to pay tax on the amount of the employer-paid portion of health and dental coverage, as it would be a taxable benefit. While it’s not clear how much such a tax could cost, the additional amount subject to tax might be hundreds or even thousands of dollars.
  • Termination of employer-paid health and dental benefit plans could lead to serious public health issues. According to a recent IPSOS poll, without coverage through group benefit plan, 84% of Canadians would end up delaying or forgoing treatment or medication if they didn’t have coverage. This will ultimately drive up treatment wait times and public health costs.mental-health
  • Among many other health outcomes, Canadians’ mental health will suffer as their covered access to needed psychological and other mental health supports will be reduced.

Take action

You can help protect the health care coverage that over 22 million Canadians rely on. Visit www.donttaxmyhealthbenefits.ca to tell your Member of Parliament and the Minister of Finance that you oppose a tax on your health and dental coverage. To ensure your voice is heard, use the hashtag #donttaxmyhealthbenefits on Facebook, Twitter.

 

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Life Insurance in 2017: Business Unusual


The process has changed but the need and value remains the same.

jengaNobody wants to buy life insurance. A recent study by industry association LIMRA (Life Insurance Market Research Association), over six million households across Canada admit that they don’t think they have enough life insurance. To put that in perspective that’s 45% of households, up from 38% in 2006 and 33% in 1999. One of the reasons sited for the widespread discrepancy is a perceived notion that the process of applying for appropriate coverage is difficult and time consuming.

That may have been the case in the past but the truth is it’s no longer true. Like just about everything else, the process of purchasing life insurance is getting faster, easier and more flexible. So, if you’re like nearly half of Canadians surveyed and you would like to purchase more life insurance but have been hesitant to start the process, there is no time like the present to explore the many new solutions that are out there.

Applications are easier

Streamlined applications, less intrusive questions, and web based applications make it much easier to get the “paperwork” done. We are living longer and healthier lives which means that many of the new products don’t require medical evidence, such has blood tests at all, saving time, inconvenience and discomfort. In some cases the entire process can be wrapped up in one meeting, enter the agents office under insured, leave with an active policy in your hands.

Decisions are faster

decisiondiceEven when you still require the old fashioned medical evidence most insurers have implemented more streamlined processes, making it easier to approve applications and provide coverage more quickly. What used to take weeks in some cases can be approved in just one or two business days.

Choices are flexible

The products themselves have evolved significantly in recent years. You can now tailor key aspects of your coverage to fit your specific needs and lifestyle. For instance, it is now possible to earn rewards and save on premiums when you make healthy lifestyle decisions. This is just the beginning, insurers continue to innovate and you can expect more choices and greater flexibility in the future.

Value was never a question

In that same survey 54% of respondents expressed concern about how their family would manage if they died unexpectedly and 43% said that the main reason to have life insurance was that it was a necessary and wise investment. Fully one-third said that if the main breadwinner died, became disabled or experienced a critical illness they would have immediate concerns regarding how to meet everyday expenses.

The thing that has held back many is the impression that life insurance is complex. The reality however is that with the right support from a qualified advisor getting the coverage you need shouldn’t be a hassle. With all of these recent enhancements buying life insurance may be the easiest part of setting up your financial plan.

Ask before you buy

askHere are some of the most important questions to ask your advisor before you sign for a new life insurance policy.

  • How much insurance do I need to adequately protect my family?

  • What’s the best kind of insurance for me – term or permanent?

  • Will this always be the right choice? If not how often will we review my needs?

  • What do I have to do to apply? Are the forms complicated? Will I need to take a medical exam?

  • How quickly can I expect a decision?

  • What happens if I get sick after I buy?

  • Is there any flexibility if my finances change and I can no longer afford the premiums?

  • Can I add any riders to protect other family members as well?

Purchasing life insurance is easier than ever before.  Contact us for a free personal needs assessment.

Lauren C. Sheil is a serial entrepreneur who has been in business for over 25 years. He has operated farming operations, a recording studio and a music manufacturing plant, has written 3 books on Economics and Christian Ethics and presented his ideas to business owners and ministry leaders from all over the world. His latest book “Meekoethics: What Happens When Life Gets Messy and the Rules Aren’t Enough” is available on Amazon.com.

Mr. Sheil is currently a Financial Security Advisor and Business Planning Specialist with one of Canada’s premier financial planning organizations.  He is passionate about helping entrepreneurs to live life to the fullest while Eliminating Debt, Building Wealth and Leaving a Legacy.  

He can be reached at themeekonomicsproject@gmail.com or by calling 613-295-4141.

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When You Don’t Know What You Don’t Know


“Thanks for offering to answer my questions but I don’t feel like I even know enough to know what I should ask. I’d rather not waste your time.”

That was how a perspective client started a conversation with me the other day. We have been personal acquaintances for about five years now and a few weeks ago when I had advertised my financial planning seminar she had wanted to come but couldn’t make it work with her schedule. I causally offered to meet for coffee sometime and answer her questions directly. The next time we spoke, a few weeks later, that’s what she said.

The sentiment expressed in this comment is all too common. It comes from a place of self deprecation and humility but also a false belief that professional advice is somehow reserved only for the “elite”. Nothing could be further from the truth.

statsStudies have shown that of households who consult with a Financial Advisor 60% feel prepared for a financial emergency, 65% feel they could manage through tough economic times and 73% are confident their families will be taken care of if they died.

So I said to my acquaintance and perspective client;

“I am actually glad you feel that way, the entire advice industry is based on the assumption that we don’t know what we don’t know so I start by asking you a series of questions to help frame your goals and dreams. The fact is you do know what questions you want to ask, you just don’t have enough confidence to ask them yet. My first task is to help you see that your questions have merit so you feel comfortable asking them.”

We’re meeting next week.

The fact is life can be complicated. When you hesitate to ask questions about things you don’t understand it makes things even more complicated than they need to be. Back in college I had a professor who used to say that the only stupid question is the one you don’t ask. When you don’t know what you don’t know you need to ask questions, even if you don’t quite know what to ask.

I’m in the advice industry and my best advice, regardless of the situation boils down to one thing – Ask Questions.

anglesA good Financial Advisor will provide integrated advice that will ensure your security is viewed from every angle. From tax advantages and protection from market volatility to personal risk management and paying attention to debt, a sound financial plan gives your financial security the attention it deserves. By guiding you through a goal setting process your advisor it will start to answer questions you might not even know enough to ask.

Don’t ever feel like you don’t know enough to talk to an expert. That’s what we are here for.

Lauren C. Sheil is a serial entrepreneur who has been in business for over 25 years. He has operated farming operations, a recording studio and a music manufacturing plant, has written 3 books on Economics and Christian Ethics and presented his ideas to business owners and ministry leaders from all over the world. His latest book “Meekoethics: What Happens When Life Gets Messy and the Rules Aren’t Enough” is available on Amazon.com.

Mr. Sheil is currently a Financial Security Advisor and Business Planning Specialist with one of Canada’s premier financial planning organizations.  He is passionate about helping entrepreneurs to live life to the fullest while Eliminating Debt, Building Wealth and Leaving a Legacy.  

He can be reached at themeekonomicsproject@gmail.com or by calling 613-295-4141.

 

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Are You A Survivor?


survivorLast night my wife and I watched the season finale of Survivor. I know we are a bit late to the party on this one but we tend to load up our PVR and binge watch things over a few days rather than invest an hour or two a week for several months. We miss the boat on some of the water cooler talk that way but in the long run it saves us lots of time so it works for us.

Usually when I watch Survivor I can’t help but wonder what the real survivalists think of this show. Forget the school yard games and the psychological game play, that’s clearly just for TV. What I want to know is how realistic are their attempts to build shelter and hunt for food? I’m guessing not very.

I am clearly not a survivalist. I don’t even have the recommended 72 hour emergency kit in my house. I know where my flash light is (I think) and the last time I used it the batteries seemed okay. I usually have at least a few bottles of water in the house but if there were to be a serious interruption of services, like a long term power outage brought about by a massive winter storm or the Zombie Apocalypse I’m pretty sure I would be one of the first to die.

All kidding aside though, all this talk of survival though got me wondering about how many of my readers would survive another type of emergency, a financial one.

emergencyLast fall Manulife Bank completed a homeowner debt survey. They found that half of the households polled have less than $1,000 in emergency savings. But considering the impact of a job loss or the cost of making a major repair like replacing a roof or a furnace, $1,000 clearly won’t go very far.

In addition to the more common unexpected expenses, consider a couple of others as well, like pet care and aging parents. Unexpected health care expenses for Fluffy the Cat can run into the thousands, $1200 for dental care alone. Provincial health plans rarely provide the level of care aging parents might need following surgery or any other kind of health crisis. Not to mention the cost of travel if you live a distance away and if you need to make a last minute trip to attend to their needs.

The survey found that while 73% of homeowners believe they are at least somewhat prepared to deal with the unexpected, 38% admitted that they were caught short when something did happen, 24% didn’t even know if they had any emergency funds at all and 13% admitted to having no money set aside for emergencies.

Click this link to my financial readiness quiz and see what areas could use some improvement in your life then call me to talk about your results and figure out what next steps you should take to boost your score.

Results

0-38 points – Some serious improvement needed

39-60 points – Moderately ready

61-75 points – Financial readiness all-star

Mr. Lauren C. Sheil is a serial entrepreneur who has been in business for over 20 years.  He is currently a Financial Security Advisor with one of Canada’s premier financial planning organizations.  He holds dual licenses from the Financial Services Commission of Ontario (FSCO) for Life, Disability and Critical Illnesses Insurance and the Mutual Fund Dealers Association of Canada (MFDA) for personal investments.  He is passionate about helping people to live life to the fullest while Eliminating Debt, Building Wealth and Leaving a Legacy.  

He can be reached at themeekonomicsporject@gmail.com or by calling 613-295-4141.

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