The Three Question Fact Find for Business Owners


Part 3 of 3

Welcome to the final installment of my series on the three question, fact finding process.  If you’re just joining us take a few minutes to catch up by going back and looking at the first five instalments and accompanying videos here:

Question One – Do you have any Debt?  Blog and video.

Question Two – Do you have a plan to sustainably protect and grow your assets?  Blog and video

Question Three – Where do you want your money to go after you die?  Blog and video

Question One for Business Owners – What would happen to you, your business and the people you care about if you didn’t show up to work tomorrow?  Blog and video

Question Two for Business Owners – Do you have a plan to protect and reward your most loyal employees?  Blog and video

Now the final question, where we start to think about life after business.

 

Question Three – Do you have a plan to one day exit the business?

 

Retirement for a business owner looks a lot different than it does for most regularly employed individuals.  Most small business owners don’t have any kind of employer sponsored RRSP or pension plan, their assets tend to be tied up in the business itself and their accountants, for the most part,  have done everything they can to reduce reported income on a yearly basis to avoid income taxes.  The result, as an individual approaches retirement, is that they are looking at a lower CPP entitlement and significant illiquidity making it challenging to fund a retirement income.

As a business grows you may not be thinking about your exit plan.  Many business owners joke that they will never retire, either because they love the work too much or they recognize that these issues will hold them back.  Regardless there will come a day when you simply can’t go to work anymore.  A good exit plan will provide you with some choice as to when that day comes and prevent you, or your family from having to sell the business quickly, at a huge discount, just to survive.

Two things to consider when developing your exit plan.

First, make sure you have a fully funded partnership buy/sell agreement containing Life, Disability and Critical Illness Insurance.  This will prevent the need to quickly sell assets at a time that may not bring the best price in order to fund an unplanned retirement, due to illness, injury or death.  If you are a sole proprietor or single shareholder corporation the need for these insurance products is by no means reduced.  Business owned insurance products could be the difference between a long and happy retirement and bankruptcy, it’s that simple.

Second, consider setting up an Individual Pension Plan (IPP).  This is a supercharged RRSP program, owned by the business for the benefit of a key executive or owner.  Many business owners have an income that is too high for the RRSP limits and relying solely on RRSP investments to fund retirement is unrealistic.  By setting up an IPP you can keep a lot of the money inside the company and pay it out over time as a pension without maxing out on RRSP contribution and RRIF income in the same way.  When you sell the business the IPP may either stay within the company, as in a case where a second generation takes over, or it may be exported into a personally owned retirement income plan/ annuity, that pays you a regular (tax advantaged) income for the rest of your life.

Regardless of how you approach retirement one thing is certain, whether you want to or not, you will stop running the business one day.  Either as a result of a formal plan to sell or transfer to family or as a result of a health emergency, or death.  Without a plan of how to manage this transition the cost, in taxes and legal fees could quickly erode the value of your life’s work and leave you and your family with only a fraction of the value you’ve put into it.

For more information or help with your financial plan contact:  lauren.sheil@f55f.com or simply leave a comment below.

The Three Question Fact Find for Business Owners (Part Two)


Part 2 of 3

Last week was a crazy one for me.  Seven client appointments in 3 days, plus a morning away from the office and a holiday Monday had me playing catch up all week.  As a result, I wasn’t able to post to the Vlog until Saturday and didn’t get a new post written here at all.  Hopefully this week I can get back into a regular rhythm of things.  Not that I’m complaining, if I don’t post for a few days it usually means I’m working directly with clients, and that’s what it’s all about right?

For the past couple of weeks, I’ve been working through a series focused on my standard The Three Question Fact Find.  Every new client relationship starts with the same three questions.  If you’re just finding this you should probably take a minute to catch up by walking through those questions and the accompanying videos here:

Question One – Do you have any Debt?  Blog and video.

Question Two – Do you have a plan to sustainably protect and grow your assets?  Blog and video

Question Three – Where do you want your money to go after you die?  Blog and video

Question One for Business Owners – What would happen to you, your business and the people you care about if you didn’t show up to work tomorrow?  Blog and video

Now we turn the focus off the individual business owner and shine the spotlight on your second greatest asset, the people who work for you.

Question Two – Do you have a plan to protect and reward your most loyal employees? 

 

As a small business owner your greatest asset is your own ability to work and earn an income.  We dealt with that last time.  Your second greatest asset is that ability to work and be productive coming from your team.

According to Stats Canada, sick days cost the Canadian economy $16.6B per year in 2013.  Companies that offer a comprehensive health plan including prescription drugs, dental, and disability insurance can expect the cost of illness to be significantly offset.

However, the greatest advantage of offering a health plan isn’t from the costs directly associated with illnesses.  It is in the goodwill and loyalty felt by employees.  According to Glassdoor.com 3 out of 5 employees say that the quality of a benefits package figured significantly in their decision to accept a job offer and their ongoing loyalty to the company.  And 92% of employees reported that, all other thing being equal, they would switch employers for a better benefits package.

Clearly benefits are important to employees.  But the financial incentive to employers doesn’t end there.  The cost of the average benefits package is 3-6% of payroll but since premiums paid are fully tax deductible, the actual out of pocket expense for a company is approximately 15% less than giving employees a comparable raise.

And that’s just a health plan.  Couple that with a retirement planning package like a Group RRSP or pension program and the loyal factor increases again.  Coming from an employer nothing says, “I appreciate you and the work you do,” more than comprehensive group health, disability and retirement plan.

So, if I could show you a way to significantly increase employee loyalty and engagement without incurring an unmanageable expense, would that be a conversation worth having?

For more information or help with your financial plan contact:  lauren.sheil@f55f.com or simply leave a comment below.

The Three Question Fact Find (Part Two)


Part 2 of 3 (For Families)

Continuing where we left off the other day.  The second question for the family market starts to focus in on your hopes and dreams for the future while still living your best life now.  Before we go any further though you might want to review where we came from and read the first post in this series.  Question One – Do you have any debt and watch the video on the same topic here.  Da L-Dawg Show – Episode 5 – Do you have any debt?

Now, let’s move on.

Question Two – Do you have a plan to sustainably protect and grow your assets?

I believe it was Charles Schwab who said that the only thing that matters to investors is yield.  While yield (or percentage growth) is important the key concept in my question for families isn’t how fast we grow your assets, it’s how we sustain that growth over the long haul through market cycles and the overall eb and flow of life.  Growing assets is easy, protecting them from market volatility and personal setbacks takes discipline, planning and a little grace.

Just about anyone can help you save for retirement.  Banks, Credit Unions and Investment Advisors can all provide you with investment vehicles designed to help you grow your assets but a financial plan is more that just an investment plan and making a mad rush to beat the RRSP income tax deadline every February isn’t sustainable.  A good financial plan answers two additional questions; “How much is enough?” and “What happens if I die too soon, live too long or my plans get interrupted?”

Answering the how much question is the easy part.  By looking at your current lifestyle, discussing your goals, and taking into consideration your life expectancy we can make a reasonable assessment of how much money you’re going to need, when, and for how long.  At that point it’s just a matter of reverse engineering where you are now, versus where you need to get to and determining how much money to set aside, for how long and at what yield.

Presto!  You now have an investment plan.  But that is still not a complete financial plan.

The tricky part comes in answering the second question.  If you die too soon your family could be put in a difficult situation, forced to make drastic changes just to survive.  The loss of your income due to death, disability or other economic pressures could present challenges keeping debts paid, funding children’s education or just keeping the lights turned on.  Not to mention the very real possibility of our medical system figuring out ways to keep you alive longer than your money can reasonably last.  This is were old school investment planning, the how much and now long discussion, meets insurance planning and becomes a full-fledged financial plan.  The effective use of life, disability and critical illness insurance, along with certain principle protected investment funds are an often-overlooked part of the planning process no matter your stage of life.

So, do you have a plan to sustainably protect and grow your assets?

Stay tuned for question three – Where do you want your money to go after you die?

For more information or help with your financial plan contact:  lauren.sheil@f55f.com or simply leave a comment below.

A Tale of Two Financial Advisors


Once upon a time there were a lot of people who bought Life Insurance and opened Small Investment Accounts from an independent financial advisor.  Unfortunately, this advisor never stayed in touch once the policy was delivered and the premium cheques were cashed.

Every day, these people wondered what had happened to the friendly advisor who seemed to genuinely care about their needs one minute and had disappeared from their lives the next.  As their life circumstances changed and their needs evolved, they wondered if they had done the right thing, if they were adequately protected, and if they would ever be able to retire.

One day they decided to take matters into their own hands, but they didn’t know where to turn, who to trust, or what questions to ask.

Because of that, they felt confused, let down, worried and distrustful of independent experts.

Because of that, they gravitated toward simple and easy solutions offered by banks and store-front brokers that gave limited advice and parked their money in simple, low risk and low return investments.

Until finally their greatest fears came true, they realized they hadn’t saved enough for retirement or someone died prematurely without adequate life insurance and it was too late to change anything.

As a result, these people had to make radical decisions just to survive.  They delayed retirement until they could no longer physically do their jobs, remortgaged or sold their homes and used the money to live on.  They lived out their golden years in a general state of stress and eventually died leaving behind little to no legacy for their loved ones.

But…

On the other side of town their lived another financial advisor who valued customer service above everything else.

Every day, he called a subset of his clients to ask if anything in their lives had changed since the last time they’d talked.  Everyone got a call at least twice a year, once on their birthday and once again throughout the year.  As their life circumstanced changed and their needs evolved, these clients knew that their advisor would make sure that they were adequately protected and were putting enough money away to eventually retire.

One day these clients decided to see if they were getting close to being able to retire and they knew exactly who to call because they trusted their advisor to always take their best interests to heart while he answered their questions and made recommendations.

Because of that, they took his advice and felt confident, calm and cared for.

Because of that, they invested their money wisely, made strong returns over a long time and carried just a little bit more Life Insurance in-case something bad and unexpected happened.

Until finally their dreams came true, they were able to retire with confidence and not worry about what might happen if someone died too soon.

As a result, these clients retired on their own terms and had the energy and time to live out their golden years in stress free comfort.  They too eventually died but they left behind a significant monetary legacy for their loved ones and many sweet memories of a life well lived.

Which advisor’s client would you like to be?  Reach out in the comments below for a no obligation consultation…

 Do you have a plan to sustainably grow your savings?


 Vlog Episode Two

According to the latest census data, 65% of Canadians say they are saving for retirement.

That’s good right?  But the same census showed that average the rate of savings is only 4.6% of household income.

The average household income in Canada is $70,336.  So that means we are saving just $3,235.46 per year.

Now most of us are pretty conservative with our investors.

We stick with medium and low risk mutual funds, bonds and so called “Blue Chip” stocks, those are the world’s biggest companies with the longest and most stable track records.  After we consider things like inflation, taxes and fees most of our investment portfolios are giving us a real rate of return somewhere in the 3% range.

So if you’re an average Canadian and you invest $3235 per year and get a 3% return in 40 years you’ll have amassed a Grant-Total of just $215,156.

Can you retire on that?

Is that sustainable?

I can hear you already – “But we can’t afford more right now”.  “I have a pension so I’ll be okay”. “What about the government programs like CPP? Won’t they support me?”  “Maybe we can increase our savings once the kids are grown up”.

Those are all valid points and one of these days I intend to address them all.  For now, if you have a company pension I just of one word for you – “Nortel”.  And CPP is great but it won’t be enough, you still need to supplement it with your own savings.

But let’s do the math on that last one.

What if you stuck with the average savings for 20 years while you were raising your family and then doubled or even tripled your it for the next 20 years?

Well in that case, if you double your savings you would end up with $260,777, tripled – about $356,000.

Better, but still not really enough.

We clearly need a different strategy.  One that starts with taking a more wholistic approach to things like lifestyle goals, takes into consideration your age and stage, and most importantly your debt ratios.

So let me ask you one more question.

If I could show you a way to sustainably grow your savings for the future – without significantly changing your lifestyle now – would that be a conversation worth having?

Write to me in the comments below or send an email at the address on your screen and let’s talk.

 

Definitely, Maybe


That’s what my business is all about.

I use a number of different “elevator” pitches when talking to perspective clients.  One of my new favorites is to begin by telling people that I help mitigate the impact of the Definitely, Maybes in our lives.  Regardless of when or even if these things happen the impact on our lives and the lives of those around us can be devastating if not properly planned for.

Here they are;

Definitely

We are all going to die.  The only question is when and what that might mean for the plans of the people we love.

Pretty much everyone can agree that the younger you are when you die the more tragic it seems.  The death of a child is almost always met with disbelief and regret for the senselessness of it all.  Such limitless potential cut short for no apparent reason.  Just about every parent I know would gladly trade places with their dying child.  Few parents put in that situation would ever consider that the collateral damage caused by their death would have a lasting impact on the life that child now gets to lead.  When a parent dies without having made adequate plans for their family the resulting financial difficulty can and most often does lead to lost opportunities and permanently alters the life trajectory of their children.

It may seem counter intuitive but the younger you are the more life insurance you should potentially have.  It’s not quite a straight line from birth to old age, more of a bell curve, peaking somewhere in middle age when your children are still young and your debts are still high but everybody dies and regardless of when that happens everyone should have some form of Life Insurance.

Maybe

When I first started in this business one statistic surprised me.  According to StatsCanada one in three Canadians between the age of 25-65 will be out of work due to illness or injury for more than 90 consecutive days at some point during their working lives.  Three months may not seem like a long time at first but considering the fact that over 90% of Canadians are only one missed pay-cheque away from serious financial stress and you have a recipe for disaster.

Without adequate insurance a prolonged period of disability is in many cases a fate worse than death.  While the financial struggles brought about by the premature death of a bread winner are tragic, the person who caused them is gone.  What if that person wasn’t gone but had to sit by, helpless and watch his or her family struggle because they failed to adequately prepare for this very strong possibility.

Thankfully most employers in Canada offer some form of Disability Insurance through a Group Health Plan but these plans are often inadequate for maintaining your lifestyle long term and many smaller employers don’t offer any coverage at all.  Which would you rather have, a job that offers you a high salary with no guarantees of continued income or a job with a slightly lower salary and guarantees an income for life if you contract a serious illness or injure yourself long term?  Personally, I think the answer is a no brainer, sadly too many people disagree with me and don’t realize how short sighted their mistake made them until it’s too late.

What if you own a small business?  There are a lot of rewards to being your own boss but insurance benefits aren’t one of them.  The high stress of running a business, coupled with the fact that business owners tend to be the least likely to own any form of disability insurance makes owning a business, regardless of what the business does, among the most vulnerable sectors of the economy to long term illness and injury.  Not to mention what could happen to the people you employ if the business suffers because you don’t show up to work for six months.

Maybe #2 (R-2.0)

Increasingly in Canada more and more people are foregoing retirement and continuing to work in some capacity well into their 70s and 80s.  The reasons for this are varied.  Some haven’t saved enough and need to keep working to survive, others are still healthy and want to stay active.  As a result, the traditional retirement age of 65 is a thing of the past but regardless of when or even if you fully retire there will come a day when you either don’t want to or simply can’t keep going.

This phase of life is what I call Retirement 2.0.   Planning for R-2.0 is about more than just saving money to live on for the next 20-30 years.  It’s about deciding what you want to do with yourself and how to fund it.  And it’s about planning for the impact of declining health.

In preR-2.0 planning is about growing your nest-egg just like always, but once you start your R2.0 life it’s about guaranteeing income and securing your legacy.

 

So that’s what I do.  I help people plan for definitely and maybes.  I can definitely help you.  Maybe you’ll contact me.

Lauren C Sheil is a Serial Entrepreneur and Financial Security Advisor.  He helps people live life to the fullest along the way teaching them to Eliminate Debt, Build Wealth and Leave a Legacy.  Write to themeekonomicsproject@gmail.com 

Is Everyone Having Fun Without Me???


Kicking the Fear of Missing Out in the Face!

Ever since mankind formed social groups we have always experienced a level of anxiety associated with being left out.  What’s the big deal about owning a wheel anyway?  Life would be so much cozier if I had a new stone fire-pit like that tribe over there.  Why didn’t Suzy invite me to the party?  But in recent years, with the advent of the internet and social media, this ancient anxiety has been ramped up to new and unprecedented levels.

In 2004 while finishing his MBA the soon to be world renowned venture capitalist Patrick J. McGinnis wrote an article for The Harbus (the student newspaper of Harvard Business School) entitled “Social Theory at HBS: McGinnis’s Two FOs”  in which he coined the phrase “The Fear of Missing Out” or FOMO.

FOMO is characterized by an almost manic drive to see and do everything.  But while you are rushing from one commitment to the next there is something else bubbling just below the surface.  You see it when people who should be engaged with their surroundings sit in the middle of a highly stimulating activity face down in their phones.  These are the people who abruptly change plans, never give a firm commitment and always seem to have one foot out the door.  They have graduated from mere FOMO, to the second FO – FOBO or the Fear of a Better Option.

FOMO is not really new.  Social Media and other forms of technology like text messaging have made it more prevalent and easier to get caught up in than ever before but the Fear of Missing Out has always been with us.  So has the Fear of a Better Option.  When I was a kid – before cell phones and social media, when phones had cords and hung on walls and computers weighed forty pounds, we called it something else.  We called it staying in touch, being popular or keeping up with the Joneses.  But whatever you call it – it’s FOMO.

As your Financial Coach it often feels like I’m fighting losing battle against FOMO and FOBO every day.  These two FOs are the main enemy of sound financial planning.  Keeping up with the Joneses when our every move is documented and published on social media is a losing game.  Especially when we think about the fact that people only post their best moments on Facebook and seem to go silent as soon as the credit card bill arrives, the bill collector comes knocking or the hydro gets turned off.  (That last one more out of necessity than choice).

We need a third FO that can over power and replace the first two.  And think I found it.  I call it FOOM, the Fear of Outliving your Money.  When FOOM takes over your every thought, FOMO and FOBO don’t stand a chance.

The Fear of Outliving your Money forces you to budget for today and save for tomorrow.  It used to be that the average person needed savings of about $1 million in order to retire comfortably.  But that’s not true anymore.  With longer life expectancy and lower interest rates that number is more like $1.5 million.

I looked at a projection for a 35 year old yesterday who earns $100,000 per year (slightly higher than the nation average) and his number was a whopping $1.9 million.  But FOMO and pressures placed on him by watching all his friends on social media has him overspending to the point that he has exactly $0.00 saved and only 30 years to go before his planned retirement date.  That means he needs to put away over $600 per month for the rest of his life starting immediately.  When I told him so he nearly fell out of his chair, not because he doesn’t have the money – he does, but because it would mean intentionally missing out on some of the life experiences he has become accustomed to.

FOOM kicked FOMO in the face!   After a little bit of bargaining because he wanted to have his cake and eat it too, (that’s FOBO) he got it.

So here’s my advice for all you people out there with a bad case of FOMO.  Go on a social media holiday – try it even for a day and see if you don’t start to feel a bit better about yourself.  At the very least stop looking at your friend’s latest vacation pictures and start a savings plan, even a small one will help.  And whenever FOMO starts to creep in look at the balance of your savings accounts and tell yourself that no what happens from now on you will always have at least that much.  As you discipline yourself and watch that money grow, FOOM will dissipate and FOMO will become irrelevant.

In many ways that’s what Financial Planning is all about.  I’m here to help you realign your priorities and help you eliminate all forms for financial fear , whether it’s FOMO, FOBO or FOOM fear has no place in financial planning.  In fact it’s the planning part the really kicks all forms of fear in the face.

 

 

You’re doing it wrong!


Living Life and Growing Your Business on Your Terms

Have you ever received unsolicited advice?

You know the kind I’m talking about. One of your “friends” takes it upon themselves to tell you how you’re screwing up your life. And if you would just make one or two “minor” changes you would be so much better off.

This advice is usually sincere. Your friends are probably genuinely worried about you. When they look at your life they likely see the struggles you go through, how hard you work for seemingly little return, the heartache, the sleepless nights, you name it. Your friends see all the stress and they are genuinely worried about you.

If you’d just give up on your dream and take a job with a steady paycheque. Or maybe just slow it down a bit and relegate your business aspirations to weekends and evenings, maybe you’d be better off. You’d have more money, less stress and live longer.

Or so they think.

But make no mistake it’s never really about you.

It’s about how they feel when they are around you. Maybe they feel sorry for you – but that’s not about you, it’s about them. Maybe they feel guilty for their own success in the face of your seeming failure – but that’s not about you either, it’s still all about them. And maybe they feel envy and jealousy because they see the huge potential for your success and wish they had what it takes to be an entrepreneur. But you guessed it, that’s not about you either.

The fact is, no one can give you advice on what you need to do to be successful. Sure there are some general principles but they are ultimately the same whether you work for a boss or not. At the end of the day nobody knows better than you what it will take for you to be successful. Nobody knows your business better than you. Nobody works harder than you. Nobody cares more than you.

So stop listening to everyone else. That’s what you’re doing wrong.

Entrepreneurship is lonely. And for the most part the pay sucks. Work your ass off for 5, maybe 10 years or even more and maybe, just maybe you’ll become so successful you’ll forget about the years of struggle that led up it.

Maybe not.

You have to be prepared to live like no one else, so that later you can live like no one else.

That’s my best unsolicited advice.  Take it or leave it.

Lauren C. Sheil is a serial entrepreneur who has been in business for over 25 years. His latest book “Meekoethics: What Happens When Life Gets Messy and the Rules Aren’t Enough” is available on Amazon.com.

He can be reached at themeekonomicsproject@gmail.com or by calling 613-295-4141.

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New Media Channel – I’m on YouTube!


Thanks to the camera in my iPhone and a free editing program I downloaded, I am know able to record my thoughts on video!

Here is the first of what I hope will become a new way to communicate my message to the world.  Check out my first Vlog – “What I do and Why I do It.”

Let me kow what you think!  Feedback is always appreciated.

The Big 3 Life Changing Events that can Significantly Affect Your Finances


In my practice as Financial Security Advisor I hear variations of these themes almost every day, my job of course is the help people live life to the fullest, get out of debt, build wealth and leave a legacy but that’s a lot harder than it sounds, especially when one of these large uncontrollable and unpredictable events occurs. But there are a few things we can do to prepare, and throw you a life line when you need it.

1 – Serious Illness

According to a Statistics Canada report from 2011, about 8% of full-time employees are away from their jobs for part or all of any given week due to illness, disability, or personal and family responsibilities. When you add it all up people miss an average of just over nine days at work every year. Illnesses very greatly in intensity and cost, they can range from a head-ache with the sniffles to Ebola. They can be acute (and over relatively quickly) or chronic (and last a long time). Whether an illness affects you or a close family member, it may lead to unpaid absences from work as well as a wide range of additional expenses that aren’t covered by provincial health plans or employer benefits.

Check with your employer or your benefits manual to find out exactly what is, and isn’t covered, and consider purchasing additional coverage in the form of Long Term Disability or Critical Illness Insurance to avoid some of the financial losses that could occur should something like this happen to you.

2 – Job Loss

Again, according to Statistics Canada, in 2015, the economy created 151,000 full-time jobs.

Yay?

On the surface this looks like good news, but it doesn’t tell the whole story. The unemployment rate still rose by 0.4% to 7.1% with 110,000 more people looking for work at the end of the year. Some of the people were of course new to the work force, newly graduated from colleges and universities, or new immigrants but others were established and experienced workers who had lost their jobs. Job loss can sweep through a specific industry, like manufacturing in Ontario or the oil patch in Alberta. Or it can happen individually. Some lucky workers are offered severance packages but too often they receive nothing and families face an immediate drop in income.

Job loss is the very definition of a financial emergency and the number one reason you should have an emergency fund of at least 3 months of expenses. Knowing your bills will be paid while you look for work and wait for other forms of support like government employment insurance to kick in can relieve a lot of stress associated with losing your job.

3 – Divorce

About 70,000 divorces are finalized every year in Canada, not to mention the breakdown of common-law relationships that never make it into the official numbers. Separation and divorce carry with them far more considerations than the merely financial concerns that come up and I don’t mean to over simplify and minimize what can be a significantly painful and personal experience. It may be the result of years of discord, or sudden and unexpected but the fact is that managing two households is significantly more expensive than one and when one party makes considerably less income than the other the impact is often felt disproportionately.

Not to mention the potential for a large legal bill at the end of it all. Engaging the help of a financial security advisor to help separate financial assets, like joint retirement accounts, life insurance policies and RESPs is a must for any separating couple.

This is by no means an exhaustive list but keeping these three things in mind when designing your financial plan could go a long way to avoiding a lot of extra head-ache, heart-ache and stress down the road.

Lauren C. Sheil is a serial entrepreneur who has been in business for over 25 years. He has operated a small farm, a recording studio and a music manufacturing plant, and has written 3 books on Economics, Ethics and Spirituality.  He has presented his ideas to business owners and leaders from all over the world. His latest book “Meekoethics: What Happens When Life Gets Messy and the Rules Aren’t Enough” is available on Amazon.com.

Mr. Sheil is currently a Financial Security Advisor and Business Planning Specialist with one of Canada’s premier financial planning organizations.  He brings to his work a passion for people and a desire to teach everyone to live life to the fullest while Eliminating Debt, Building Wealth and Leaving a Legacy.  

He can be reached at themeekonomicsproject@gmail.com or by calling 613-295-4141.

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